Showing posts with label Indus River. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Indus River. Show all posts

Saturday, December 30, 2023

Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


A recent meeting of Pakistani environmentalists and experts in Sukkur at the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Center, organised by WWF Pakistan, discussed the deaths of Indus River dolphins and urged for a complete ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. The meeting was prompted by the discovery of five dead dolphins last month, four of which were found near Rohri at the village of Ali Wahan. Three of the dead dolphins were females. Two of them were buried, while the other three were examined by WWF Pakistan conservationists Muhammad Imran, Liaqat Ali Khokhar, cetacean expert Francois Xavier Pelletier, and Sindh Wildlife Department staff. The examination revealed that the dolphins died from either net entanglement or chemical poisoning. Samples were collected for further testing and a report will be released after the analysis. Uzma Noureen, the project coordinator for the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project (IRDCP), said that an action plan against the use of harmful chemicals will be developed once the samples are analysed. She also mentioned that a dolphin was rescued from the Nara Canal before the deaths were reported. Ghulam Mustafa Gopang, the district officer of the Sindh Fisheries Department, expressed his worry about the fishing practices and said that they need to be changed or improved. Taj Muhammad Sheikh, the deputy conservator of the wildlife department, demanded a ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. Abdul Sattar Saryo, the assistant engineer of the Irrigation Department, said that the department will offer any assistance to monitor the barrage gates, canals, and any other places where dolphins might be in trouble.  

     I appreciate that Pakistan is taking steps to protect its river dolphin population, but I think more needs to be done. This rare dolphin has lost 80% of its original habitat due to water scarcity, excessive use of agrochemicals in the river basin, and discharge of untreated wastewater. It has also suffered from illegal fishing methods that involve nets and poisons that kill the dolphins. These dolphins, along with their relatives the Ganges and Amazon River dolphins, are indicators of freshwater quality. They share their habitat with many other aquatic animals that depend on them. If these dolphins disappear, the whole ecosystem will be affected. That is why I strongly believe that serious measures should be taken to restore their populations. One way to do this is to raise awareness among the public about the status and importance of these dolphins. Another way is to educate the fishermen about the ecological role of these dolphins and how to avoid harming them. This way, the river dolphins can reclaim their ancestral range and thrive in their native rivers.


  • How Pakistan Can Save Its Endangered River Dolphins
  • The Plight of the Indus River Dolphins: Causes and Solutions
  • Indus River Dolphins: A Rare Species Facing Multiple Threats
  • Why Pakistan Needs to Ban Fishing in the Dolphin Reserve Area
  • Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


Source: 30/12/2023

Forest Department Government’s of Sindh Official


#SaveTheIndusDolphins
#IndusDolphinReserve
#BanFishingInDolphinArea
#ProtectTheRiverEcosystem
#DolphinsAreOurFriends



A group of people wearing protective masks and gloves holding a banner that says “Save the Indus River Dolphins” in front of a river.

Wednesday, December 27, 2023

The Indus River and Rohri: A Historical and Cultural Connection

The Indus River is one of the longest and most important rivers in Asia, flowing through China, India, and Pakistan. It has been a source of life, civilisation, and trade for thousands of years, and has witnessed the rise and fall of many empires and cultures. The Indus River is also home to a rich and diverse wildlife, including the endangered Indus river dolphin.

One of the cities that lies on the banks of the Indus River is Rohri, a city of Sukkur District in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Rohri is located on the east bank of the river, directly across from Sukkur, the third largest city in Sindh. Rohri has a long and fascinating history, dating back to the ancient times.

Rohri was originally founded as Roruka, the capital of the Sauvira Kingdom, which is mentioned in early Buddhist literature. Roruka was a major trading center, and was connected to other cities by the Grand Trunk Road, one of the oldest and longest roads in Asia. Roruka was also the site of a famous battle between Alexander the Great and King Porus in 326 BCE.

Roruka was later renamed as Aror, and became the capital of the Ror dynasty, which ruled northern Sindh from the 5th century BCE to the 5th century CE. Aror was then conquered by the Rai dynasty ( Locally known as Raja Dahir ), followed by the Brahman dynasty, which were both Hindu dynasties that resisted the Arab invasion of Sindh in the 8th century CE. Aror was finally captured by the Muslim general Muhammad bin Qasim in 711 CE, who established the Umayyad Caliphate in Sindh.

In 962 CE, a massive earthquake struck the region, causing the course of the Indus River to shift. Aror was abandoned and re-founded as Rohri on the new bank of the river. Rohri continued to serve as a busy port and a cultural hub, attracting many saints, poets, and scholars. Rohri is famous for its shrines, such as the Sateen Jo Aastan, the tomb of the Seven Sisters who were the daughters of a Hindu king and converted to Islam. Rohri is also known for its bridges, such as the Lansdowne Bridge and the Ayub Bridge, which span the Indus River and offer access between Rohri and Sukkur.

The Indus River and Rohri have a historical and cultural connection that spans centuries and civilizations. They are both symbols of the diversity, resilience, and beauty of the people and the land of Sindh.



A Brief Introduction to the Rai Dynasty of Sindh
A paragraph that summarises the main points of the text, such as:

A map of the Indian subcontinent in the 6th century CE, showing the political boundaries of various kingdoms and regions. The map is colored according to the dominant religion of each area: Hinduism (orange), Buddhism (yellow), Jainism (green), and Zoroastrianism (red). The map also shows the major rivers, mountains, and cities of the region. The focus of the map is on the province of Sindh, which is located in the lower right corner of the map, along the Indus River. Sindh is marked by a black border and labeled as "Rai dynasty". The Rai dynasty was the first known ruling dynasty of Sindh, and it controlled much of the northwestern regions of the Indian subcontinent. The map also shows the neighboring kingdoms and regions that had relations with the Rai dynasty, such as the Hephthalites, the Sassanians, the Gupta Empire, the Chalukyas, and the Maitrakas.


Source 

The Harappan Civilization and its Neighbors: This article explores the history, culture, and legacy of the Harappan Civilization, also known as the Indus River Valley Civilization, which flourished along the Indus River and its tributaries from 3300 to 1300 BCE. It highlights the features and achievements of its two main urban centers, Harappa and Mohenjo-daro, and how they differed from and interacted with other ancient civilisations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China.

The Indus River and its Role in Asia: This article provides a comprehensive overview of the Indus River, one of the major rivers in Asia. It follows the source, path, branches, watershed, weather, environment, and past of the river, as well as its importance for the people and the region of South Asia.


The Harappan Culture and its History: This article introduces the Harappan Culture, also known as the Indus River Valley Civilization, which thrived along the Indus River and its branches from 3300 to 1300 BCE. It describes the location, society, commerce, faith, and downfall of this ancient civilisations.