Showing posts with label River Indus. Show all posts
Showing posts with label River Indus. Show all posts

Thursday, February 15, 2024

Journey Through Pakistan's Railway: Rohri Train Station

 

A panoramic view of Rohri Junction railway station, a historic and cultural landmark of Pakistan, with trains, platforms, buildings, and hills in the background.


Embark on a captivating journey through Pakistan's railway as we explore the historic Rohri Train Station and its significance in the country's transportation system.

A Brief History of Rohri Train Station

Rohri Train Station, located in Rohri, Pakistan, has a rich history that dates back to its establishment in the late 19th century. It was built during the British Raj and served as an important stop on the Indus Valley Railway, connecting Karachi with the northern regions of British India.

The station played a vital role in facilitating trade and transportation between different parts of the country. Over the years, it has witnessed the transformation of Pakistan's railway system and has become an integral part of the country's transportation infrastructure.

Unique Architectural Wonders at Rohri Train Station

Rohri Train Station is known for its unique architectural wonders that reflect a blend of British colonial and local architectural styles. The station building features intricate designs, grand arches, and large windows that allow natural light to illuminate the interior.

One of the notable architectural elements is the clock tower, which stands tall and serves as a symbol of the station's historical importance. The station's platform is spacious and well-maintained, providing a comfortable waiting area for passengers.

Connecting Pakistan: Routes from Rohri Train Station

Rohri Train Station serves as a major hub, connecting various cities and regions across Pakistan through its extensive railway network. It is a crucial link between Karachi, the country's largest city and economic hub, and other important cities such as Lahore, Islamabad, and Peshawar.

The station offers multiple train routes that cater to both passenger and freight transportation needs. These routes provide convenient access to different parts of the country, allowing people to travel and transport goods efficiently.

Cultural Significance of Rohri Train Station

Rohri Train Station holds great cultural significance for the people of Pakistan. It has witnessed the passage of time and the changing dynamics of the country. Many people have fond memories associated with the station, as it has been a witness to countless journeys, reunions, and farewells.

The station also serves as a meeting point for people from diverse backgrounds, reflecting the cultural diversity of Pakistan. It is a place where people from different regions come together, fostering social interactions and cultural exchange.

Future Development Plans for Rohri Train Station

In order to meet the growing demands of the modern era, there are plans for future development and improvement of Rohri Train Station. These plans include the expansion of the station's facilities to accommodate increasing passenger and freight traffic.

Additionally, efforts are being made to enhance the overall infrastructure and services at the station, ensuring a seamless travel experience for passengers. The aim is to make Rohri Train Station a modern transportation hub that meets international standards and contributes to the development of the region.

  • Rohri Train Station: A Historic and Cultural Landmark of Pakistan
  • Exploring the Wonders of Rohri Train Station: Pakistan’s Railway Heritage
  • How Rohri Train Station Connects Pakistan’s Past, Present, and Future
  • The Story of Rohri Train Station: A Journey Through Pakistan’s Railway History
  • Rohri Train Station: A Symbol of Pakistan’s Transportation Development

Pakistan Railways Website: 

Saturday, December 30, 2023

Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


A recent meeting of Pakistani environmentalists and experts in Sukkur at the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Center, organised by WWF Pakistan, discussed the deaths of Indus River dolphins and urged for a complete ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. The meeting was prompted by the discovery of five dead dolphins last month, four of which were found near Rohri at the village of Ali Wahan. Three of the dead dolphins were females. Two of them were buried, while the other three were examined by WWF Pakistan conservationists Muhammad Imran, Liaqat Ali Khokhar, cetacean expert Francois Xavier Pelletier, and Sindh Wildlife Department staff. The examination revealed that the dolphins died from either net entanglement or chemical poisoning. Samples were collected for further testing and a report will be released after the analysis. Uzma Noureen, the project coordinator for the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project (IRDCP), said that an action plan against the use of harmful chemicals will be developed once the samples are analysed. She also mentioned that a dolphin was rescued from the Nara Canal before the deaths were reported. Ghulam Mustafa Gopang, the district officer of the Sindh Fisheries Department, expressed his worry about the fishing practices and said that they need to be changed or improved. Taj Muhammad Sheikh, the deputy conservator of the wildlife department, demanded a ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. Abdul Sattar Saryo, the assistant engineer of the Irrigation Department, said that the department will offer any assistance to monitor the barrage gates, canals, and any other places where dolphins might be in trouble.  

     I appreciate that Pakistan is taking steps to protect its river dolphin population, but I think more needs to be done. This rare dolphin has lost 80% of its original habitat due to water scarcity, excessive use of agrochemicals in the river basin, and discharge of untreated wastewater. It has also suffered from illegal fishing methods that involve nets and poisons that kill the dolphins. These dolphins, along with their relatives the Ganges and Amazon River dolphins, are indicators of freshwater quality. They share their habitat with many other aquatic animals that depend on them. If these dolphins disappear, the whole ecosystem will be affected. That is why I strongly believe that serious measures should be taken to restore their populations. One way to do this is to raise awareness among the public about the status and importance of these dolphins. Another way is to educate the fishermen about the ecological role of these dolphins and how to avoid harming them. This way, the river dolphins can reclaim their ancestral range and thrive in their native rivers.


  • How Pakistan Can Save Its Endangered River Dolphins
  • The Plight of the Indus River Dolphins: Causes and Solutions
  • Indus River Dolphins: A Rare Species Facing Multiple Threats
  • Why Pakistan Needs to Ban Fishing in the Dolphin Reserve Area
  • Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


Source: 30/12/2023

Forest Department Government’s of Sindh Official


#SaveTheIndusDolphins
#IndusDolphinReserve
#BanFishingInDolphinArea
#ProtectTheRiverEcosystem
#DolphinsAreOurFriends



A group of people wearing protective masks and gloves holding a banner that says “Save the Indus River Dolphins” in front of a river.

Friday, December 29, 2023

Mohenjo Daro: The Mound of the Dead Men

Aerial view of Mohenjo Daro, an ancient city located in present-day Pakistan.
Mohenjo Daro: A Glimpse into the Past of Pakistan.

Mohenjo-daro Sindhi: موهن جو دڙو‎ Urdu: موئن جو دڑو Mound of the Dead Men Mohenjo Daro is an ancient city located in present-day Pakistan. It was built around 2500 B.C. on the flood plains of the Indus in what is now Pakistan. The city’s well-planned street grid and elaborate drainage system hint that its inhabitants were skilled urban planners with a reverence for the control of water.

      The city’s wealth and stature is evident in artefacts such as ivory, lapis, carnelian, and gold beads, as well as the baked-brick city structures themselves.  The city’s occupants were apparently modest, orderly, and clean, and preferred standardisation in pottery and tools of copper and stone. Seals and weights suggest a system of tightly controlled trade. The city lacked ostentatious palaces, temples, or monuments, and there was no obvious central seat of government or evidence of a king or queen. 

The Indus Valley Civilization and its Iconic Priest-King Sculpture


 A stone statue of a man with a beard and a circular headpiece, wearing a cloak with a distinctive design Ajrak, identified as the Priest-King from the ruined city of Mohenjo-daro in the Indus Valley Civilization

    The city’s decline remains a puzzle, but some experts believe that climate change and environmental degradation may have played a role.

     It is worth noting that Mohenjo Daro is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is considered among the best preserved urban settlements in South Asia.

      Mohenjo Daro, an ancient city located in present-day Pakistan, was built around 2500 B.C. on the flood plains of the Indus River. It was the largest city of the Indus Civilisation and is believed to have thrived for a thousand years, profiting from trade and engineering feats like the Great Bath.

 The city’s well-planned street grid and elaborate drainage system hint that its inhabitants were skilled urban planners with a reverence for the control of water. The city’s wealth and stature is evident in artefacts such as ivory, lapis, carnelian, and gold beads, as well as the baked-brick city structures themselves. 

     The city’s occupants were apparently modest, orderly, and clean, and preferred standardisation in pottery and tools of copper and stone. Seals and weights suggest a system of tightly controlled trade.

     The city lacked ostentatious palaces, temples, or monuments, and there was no obvious central seat of government or evidence of a king or queen The city’s decline remains a puzzle, but some experts believe that climate change and environmental degradation may have played a role

  • Mohenjo Daro: The Ancient City of the Indus Civilisation
  • Mohenjo Daro: A Glimpse into the Past of Pakistan
  • Mohenjo Daro: The Mound of the Dead Men
  • Mohenjo Daro: A Testament to the Ingenuity of the Indus Valley Civilisation

How to get and do in Mohenjo Daro

 Is approximately 30 kilometre’s away from the nearest major city, Larkana.  The easiest way to get to Mohenjo Daro is by taking a direct flight from Sukkur Airport to Mohenjo Daro Airport.

Alternatively, you can drive along the Indus Highway between Karachi and Peshawar. Rohri / Sukkur Toll Plaza M5 Sukkur Hyderabad MotowaysThe distance between Rohri and Mohenjo Daro is approximately 85.06 kilometres or 52.85 miles.Once you arrive at Mohenjo Daro. 

Sukkur Airport

 Sukkur Airport (IATA: SKZ, ICAO: OPSK), also known as Begum Nusrat Bhutto International Airport Sukkur, is a domestic airport located in Sukkur, Sindh, Pakistan. It is a medium-sized airport located about 8 km (5.0 mi) from the center of Sukkur and serves Sukkur and its surrounding areas; Khairpur, Jacobabad, Sibi, and Shikarpur. Officially Site is. https://www.piac.com.pk/

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

Wednesday, December 27, 2023

The Indus River and Rohri: A Historical and Cultural Connection

The Indus River is one of the longest and most important rivers in Asia, flowing through China, India, and Pakistan. It has been a source of life, civilisation, and trade for thousands of years, and has witnessed the rise and fall of many empires and cultures. The Indus River is also home to a rich and diverse wildlife, including the endangered Indus river dolphin.

One of the cities that lies on the banks of the Indus River is Rohri, a city of Sukkur District in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Rohri is located on the east bank of the river, directly across from Sukkur, the third largest city in Sindh. Rohri has a long and fascinating history, dating back to the ancient times.

Rohri was originally founded as Roruka, the capital of the Sauvira Kingdom, which is mentioned in early Buddhist literature. Roruka was a major trading center, and was connected to other cities by the Grand Trunk Road, one of the oldest and longest roads in Asia. Roruka was also the site of a famous battle between Alexander the Great and King Porus in 326 BCE.

Roruka was later renamed as Aror, and became the capital of the Ror dynasty, which ruled northern Sindh from the 5th century BCE to the 5th century CE. Aror was then conquered by the Rai dynasty ( Locally known as Raja Dahir ), followed by the Brahman dynasty, which were both Hindu dynasties that resisted the Arab invasion of Sindh in the 8th century CE. Aror was finally captured by the Muslim general Muhammad bin Qasim in 711 CE, who established the Umayyad Caliphate in Sindh.

In 962 CE, a massive earthquake struck the region, causing the course of the Indus River to shift. Aror was abandoned and re-founded as Rohri on the new bank of the river. Rohri continued to serve as a busy port and a cultural hub, attracting many saints, poets, and scholars. Rohri is famous for its shrines, such as the Sateen Jo Aastan, the tomb of the Seven Sisters who were the daughters of a Hindu king and converted to Islam. Rohri is also known for its bridges, such as the Lansdowne Bridge and the Ayub Bridge, which span the Indus River and offer access between Rohri and Sukkur.

The Indus River and Rohri have a historical and cultural connection that spans centuries and civilizations. They are both symbols of the diversity, resilience, and beauty of the people and the land of Sindh.



A Brief Introduction to the Rai Dynasty of Sindh
A paragraph that summarises the main points of the text, such as:

A map of the Indian subcontinent in the 6th century CE, showing the political boundaries of various kingdoms and regions. The map is colored according to the dominant religion of each area: Hinduism (orange), Buddhism (yellow), Jainism (green), and Zoroastrianism (red). The map also shows the major rivers, mountains, and cities of the region. The focus of the map is on the province of Sindh, which is located in the lower right corner of the map, along the Indus River. Sindh is marked by a black border and labeled as "Rai dynasty". The Rai dynasty was the first known ruling dynasty of Sindh, and it controlled much of the northwestern regions of the Indian subcontinent. The map also shows the neighboring kingdoms and regions that had relations with the Rai dynasty, such as the Hephthalites, the Sassanians, the Gupta Empire, the Chalukyas, and the Maitrakas.


Source 

The Harappan Civilization and its Neighbors: This article explores the history, culture, and legacy of the Harappan Civilization, also known as the Indus River Valley Civilization, which flourished along the Indus River and its tributaries from 3300 to 1300 BCE. It highlights the features and achievements of its two main urban centers, Harappa and Mohenjo-daro, and how they differed from and interacted with other ancient civilisations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China.

The Indus River and its Role in Asia: This article provides a comprehensive overview of the Indus River, one of the major rivers in Asia. It follows the source, path, branches, watershed, weather, environment, and past of the river, as well as its importance for the people and the region of South Asia.


The Harappan Culture and its History: This article introduces the Harappan Culture, also known as the Indus River Valley Civilization, which thrived along the Indus River and its branches from 3300 to 1300 BCE. It describes the location, society, commerce, faith, and downfall of this ancient civilisations.







Saturday, December 23, 2023

Exploring Sadh Belo rohri: The Largest Hindu Temple in Pakistan

Picture Source Wikipedia Sadh Belo
Sadh Belo (Sindhiساڌ ٻيلوUrduسادھ بھيلو) It’s Sindhi Language  Meaning Island of Sadh


     Sukkur, a city in the Sindh province of Pakistan, is known for its historical and cultural attractions. One of the most remarkable places in Sukkur is Sadhu Belo, an island in the Indus River that is home to a highly revered Hindu temple complex. Sadhu Belo, which means the woods of the sage, is associated with the syncretic Udasi movement of Sikhism. The island is also famous for Teerath Asthan, which is the biggest Hindu temple in Pakistan.

The History of Sadhu Belo

The island of Sadhu Belo was once a forested island called Menak Parbat. According to legend, the island was visited by Lord Rama, the hero of the Hindu epic Ramayana, during his exile. The island was also a place of meditation for many sages and saints.

The most prominent figure in the history of Sadhu Belo is Baba Bankhandi Maharaj, an Udasi saint who founded the temple complex in 1823. Baba Bankhandi Maharaj was born as Balchand Sharma, and he came to Sindh from either Delhi or Nepal when he was 15 years old. He settled on the island and became known as the sage of the woods. He established a dhuni, a sacred fire, on the island and attracted many followers and devotees. He also built a temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, the supreme deity of Hinduism.

Baba Bankhandi Maharaj was a visionary and a philanthropist. He is credited with building a bridge across the Indus River, connecting Sukkur and Rohri . He also dug wells and planted trees on the island, making it a green and fertile place. He also performed many miracles and healed many people. He died in 1899 and his samadhi, or tomb, is located on the island.

The Architecture of Sadhu Belo

The temple complex of Sadhu Belo is spread over two interconnected islands: Sadhu Belo and Deen Belo. The complex has nine temples, a library, a dining area, a garden, and residences for monks and pilgrims. The temples are dedicated to various Hindu gods and goddesses, such as Shiva, Vishnu, Ganesha, Hanuman, Durga, and Kali. The temples are adorned with intricate marble work, colorful paintings, and statues. The complex also has a museum that displays relics and artifacts related to the history and culture of Hinduism and Sikhism in Sindh.

The most prominent temple in the complex is Teerath Asthan, which means the place of pilgrimage. Teerath Asthan is the biggest Hindu temple in Pakistan and can accommodate up to 10,000 people. The temple was built in 1938 by Sant Ganga Ram, a disciple of Baba Bankhandi Maharaj. The temple has a dome-shaped roof and a spire that rises above the river. The temple has a large hall where the main idol of Lord Shiva is installed. The temple also has a shivalinga, a symbol of Shiva, that is believed to have been brought by Baba Bankhandi Maharaj from the Himalayas. The temple is the site of many festivals and ceremonies, such as Shivratri, the birthday of Lord Shiva, and Bankhandi Mela, the death anniversary of Baba Bankhandi Maharaj.

The Significance of Sadhu Belo

Sadhu Belo is a sacred and peaceful place for Hindus and Sikhs in Pakistan and abroad. The island is a symbol of harmony and tolerance, as it welcomes people of all faiths and backgrounds. The island is also a source of inspiration and education, as it preserves and promotes the rich heritage and traditions of Hinduism and Sikhism in Sindh. The island is also a place of service and charity, as it provides free food, water, and accommodation to the visitors and the needy.

Sadhu Belo is a unique and beautiful island that reflects the diversity and spirituality of Pakistan. It is a place that deserves to be visited and appreciated by everyone.


Source Books Sukkur and Online source 

Friday, December 22, 2023

Khwaja Khizr: The Mysterious Saint of Water

 Khwaja Khizr is a Sufi saint who is associated with water, wisdom, and eternal life. He is revered by Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs in various regions of South Asia, especially in Pakistan and India. He is also known by other names, such as Zinda Pir, Khwaja Khidr, Khizr Elias, and Khwaja Pir.

Khawaja Khizr’s life and miracles

The date calculated from the slab states that the shrine was built in 341 AH (952 AD). However, this is a still contested fact by historians and archaeologists.

A niche for lighting earthen lamps.

The throne or gaddi of Khwaja Khizr.


     According to some traditions, Khwaja Khizr is the son of Darya Khan, a ruler of Multan in the 15th century. He was a devout Muslim who spent his life in prayer and meditation. He also performed many miracles, such as healing the sick, reviving the dead, and controlling the waters. He is said to have a green complexion and a green cloak, symbolizing his connection to water and vegetation. He is also believed to have the power of invisibility and to appear and disappear at will.

     Some scholars identify Khwaja Khizr with al-Khidr, a figure mentioned in the Quran as a righteous servant of God who possessed great knowledge and mystic insight. He was the companion and teacher of the prophet Musa (Moses), who questioned him about his seemingly unjust actions, such as sinking a ship, killing a young man, and repairing a wall. Al-Khidr explained that his actions had hidden wisdom and benefits that Musa could not comprehend. Al-Khidr is also considered to be a prophet, an angel, or a wali (friend of God) by different Islamic sects and schools of thought.

     Another possible identification of Khwaja Khizr is with Utnapishtim, a character from the ancient Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh. He was the survivor of a great flood that wiped out humanity, and he was granted immortality by the gods. He lived on an island at the mouth of the rivers, where he met Gilgamesh, the king of Uruk, who sought the secret of eternal life. Utnapishtim told him the story of the flood and tested him with various challenges, but Gilgamesh failed to achieve his goal.

     Khwaja Khizr is also associated with various other figures and legends from different cultures and religions, such as Saint George, Elijah, John the Baptist, Sargis the General, and Jhulelal. He is seen as a patron of travelers, sailors, fishermen, and seekers of spiritual knowledge. He is also a protector of rivers, lakes, springs, and wells. He is believed to appear to his devotees in times of need and to grant them blessings and guidance.

     Khwaja Khizr is honored and celebrated in various ways by his followers. He has many shrines and tombs dedicated to him, such as the Khwaja Khizr Tomb in Sonipat, India, the Zinda Pir Shrine in Sukkur, Pakistan, and the Khwaja Khizr Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan. He is also commemorated on the festival of Hıdırellez, which marks the arrival of spring and the meeting of Khwaja Khizr and Elijah. On this day, people make wishes, offer prayers, and perform rituals near water sources, hoping to receive the grace and favor of Khwaja Khizr.


Feel free comments 

Wednesday, December 20, 2023

Lansdowne Bridge Rohri: A Historic and Engineering Marvel

Lansdowne Bridge Rohri:    

 A Historic and Engineering Marvel The Lansdowne Bridge Rohri is a 19th-century bridge that spans the Indus River between the cities of Sukkur and Rohri, in the Sindh province of Pakistan. It was named after Lord Lansdowne, the viceroy of India at the time of its inauguration in 1889. The bridge is a remarkable feat of engineering, as it was the longest cantilever bridge in the world when it was completed, and it had to support the load of heavy steam locomotives. The bridge also has a significant historical and cultural value, as it connected the regions of Sindh and Balochistan, and facilitated trade and travel across the Indus Valley.

 Design and Construction 

    The Lansdowne Bridge Rohri was designed by Sir Alexander Meadows Rendel, a British civil engineer who specialized in railway and bridge projects. He designed the bridge as a cantilever truss, which consists of two arms projecting from each pier and meeting at the center without any intermediate support. The bridge has a total length of 820 feet, and a span of 790 feet, making it the longest rigid girder bridge in the world at the time. The girder work, weighing a massive 3,300 tons, was manufactured in London by the firm of Westwood, Baillie and erected by F.E. Robertson, and Hecquet

     The construction of the bridge was a challenging task, as the river bed at the site was not rocky but silty, making it difficult to build a stable foundation. Moreover, the river was prone to floods and changes in its course, which posed a risk to the workers and the materials. The construction also claimed six lives, four men fell from the dizzy heights and two were killed by tools falling on them. The cost of the bridge was Rs 2.7 million, including Rs 276,000 that were spent on foundations only.
     The bridge was inaugurated on March 25, 1889, by Lord Reay, the governor of Bombay, who deputized for Lord Lansdowne, the viceroy of India. The bridge allowed for easier rail access between Sindh and Balochistan, and also linked the westernmost post of Khyber Pass to the eastern city of Calcutta. The bridge was a vital part of the Indus Valley State Railway, which was later merged into the North-Western Railway, and then the Pakistan Railways.

Legacy and Significance 

     The Lansdowne Bridge Rohri is not only a remarkable engineering achievement, but also a symbol of the historical and cultural heritage of the region. The bridge connects the two ancient cities of Sukkur and Rohri, which have been inhabited since the Indus Valley Civilization, and have witnessed the rise and fall of various empires and dynasties. The bridge also overlooks the Bukkur Island, which is home to several historical monuments, such as the Tomb of Khwaja Khizr, the Fort of Bukkur, and the Masjid of Mir Masum. The bridge also offers a scenic view of the Indus River, which is the lifeline of the region and the source of its rich agriculture and biodiversity.

     The bridge has been a witness to many historical events and changes, such as the Partition of India, the creation of Pakistan, the wars with India, and the development of the country. The bridge has also been a source of inspiration and pride for many people, such as poets, writers, artists, and travelers, who have praised its beauty and grandeur. The bridge is also a popular tourist attraction, and a site of festivals and celebrations, such as the Sindhi Culture Day, the Independence Day, and the Basant Festival.

     The Lansdowne Bridge Rohri is a historic and engineering marvel that deserves to be preserved and appreciated for its contribution to the region and the country. The bridge is a testament to the skill and vision of its designers and builders, and the resilience and diversity of its people. The bridge is a bridge of history, culture, and progress.




Sunday, December 17, 2023

Ayoub Bridge: A Marvel of Engineering and History in Pakistan

The Ayoub bridge is a railway bridge over the River Indus between Rohri and Sukkur in Sindh, Pakistan. It was inaugurated by President Ayub Khan in 1962, and it is the world’s third longest railway arch span and the first railway bridge in the world to be slung on coiled wire rope suspenders. The bridge is about 806 feet long, 247 feet high and cost 21.6 million PKR. It has served for 50 years by providing a strong link for rail traffic.

The bridge was designed by David B. Steinman, a renowned American engineer who also reconstructed the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. The contractor was Dorman Long Gammon of London, famous for the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932. The construction of the bridge was challenging, as the river bed had rocks that did not allow the pillars to withstand the constant flow and pressure of water. Therefore, four huge cemented abutments were made on each side of the river banks, and then the steel arch was lifted and fixed on them with the help of cranes and cables.

The bridge is a symbol of engineering excellence and national pride for Pakistan. It also has historical and cultural significance, as it replaced the old Lansdowne Bridge that was used for boat and bicycle transport between Sukkur and Rohri. The bridge offers a spectacular view of the river and the surrounding landscape, especially at sunset. You can watch a video of the bridge from a train journey here

Source 
Ayoub Bridge at sunset The bridge offers a spectacular view of the river and the surrounding landscape, especially at sunset