Showing posts with label Wildlife. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wildlife. Show all posts

Saturday, December 30, 2023

Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


A recent meeting of Pakistani environmentalists and experts in Sukkur at the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Center, organised by WWF Pakistan, discussed the deaths of Indus River dolphins and urged for a complete ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. The meeting was prompted by the discovery of five dead dolphins last month, four of which were found near Rohri at the village of Ali Wahan. Three of the dead dolphins were females. Two of them were buried, while the other three were examined by WWF Pakistan conservationists Muhammad Imran, Liaqat Ali Khokhar, cetacean expert Francois Xavier Pelletier, and Sindh Wildlife Department staff. The examination revealed that the dolphins died from either net entanglement or chemical poisoning. Samples were collected for further testing and a report will be released after the analysis. Uzma Noureen, the project coordinator for the Indus River Dolphin Conservation Project (IRDCP), said that an action plan against the use of harmful chemicals will be developed once the samples are analysed. She also mentioned that a dolphin was rescued from the Nara Canal before the deaths were reported. Ghulam Mustafa Gopang, the district officer of the Sindh Fisheries Department, expressed his worry about the fishing practices and said that they need to be changed or improved. Taj Muhammad Sheikh, the deputy conservator of the wildlife department, demanded a ban on fishing in the dolphin reserve area. Abdul Sattar Saryo, the assistant engineer of the Irrigation Department, said that the department will offer any assistance to monitor the barrage gates, canals, and any other places where dolphins might be in trouble.  

     I appreciate that Pakistan is taking steps to protect its river dolphin population, but I think more needs to be done. This rare dolphin has lost 80% of its original habitat due to water scarcity, excessive use of agrochemicals in the river basin, and discharge of untreated wastewater. It has also suffered from illegal fishing methods that involve nets and poisons that kill the dolphins. These dolphins, along with their relatives the Ganges and Amazon River dolphins, are indicators of freshwater quality. They share their habitat with many other aquatic animals that depend on them. If these dolphins disappear, the whole ecosystem will be affected. That is why I strongly believe that serious measures should be taken to restore their populations. One way to do this is to raise awareness among the public about the status and importance of these dolphins. Another way is to educate the fishermen about the ecological role of these dolphins and how to avoid harming them. This way, the river dolphins can reclaim their ancestral range and thrive in their native rivers.


  • How Pakistan Can Save Its Endangered River Dolphins
  • The Plight of the Indus River Dolphins: Causes and Solutions
  • Indus River Dolphins: A Rare Species Facing Multiple Threats
  • Why Pakistan Needs to Ban Fishing in the Dolphin Reserve Area
  • Protecting the Indus River Dolphins: A Call for Action


Source: 30/12/2023

Forest Department Government’s of Sindh Official


#SaveTheIndusDolphins
#IndusDolphinReserve
#BanFishingInDolphinArea
#ProtectTheRiverEcosystem
#DolphinsAreOurFriends



A group of people wearing protective masks and gloves holding a banner that says “Save the Indus River Dolphins” in front of a river.